tomato blossom end rot

Question: How do I prevent blossom end rot on my tomatoes?

Answer: Keep your soil evenly moist, especially during the hottest weeks. A good layer of mulch is mandatory. If the problem continues, you may need to add some calcium to your soil. To add calcium, mix lime into the soil around your tomato plant. No, we’re not talking about the green citrus, but rather the soil amendment made by grinding limestone, a naturally occurring type of rock that is very high in calcium.¬†Also, be sure to rotate your crops every year. Don’t plant tomatoes in the same spot they grew last summer, where the soil is depleted from the same nutrients needed to grow tomatoes. Instead, plant them where another type of crop grew, and you won’t have to replenish the soil quite as much.

Jan Phipps is a University of Illinois Extension Master Gardener. She farms, gardens, writes and podcasts near Chrisman, Illinois.

Photo: Flickr user cromely

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2 COMMENTS

    • Hi Randy,

      You can mix in lime to the soil. Lime is a soil amendment made by grinding limestone, a naturally occurring type of rock that is very high in calcium. It is available by the bag at most garden stores in the fertilizer section. We’ve also added this into the answer above, in case anyone else was wondering how to add calcium to soil. Hope this helps!

      Jessy Yancey
      editor, farmflavor.com

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