Traditional Wassail Recipe
You'll be ready to go a-wassailing with this hot toddy recipe that blends apple cider, orange juice and fall spices into a delicious warm beverage.
  • Makes: 8 servings of ⅔ cup each
  • Prep Time: 5 minutes
  • Cook Time: 30 minutes
  • Difficulty Rating: Easy

  • Nutrition Highlights: Apples contain cholesterol-lowering soluble fiber.

  • Recipe Created By:
  • Recipe From: Illinois Partners

Recommended

If you like to go a-wassailing, you might also enjoy these traditional and historical Christmas recipes:

Ingredients

  • 1 gallon apple cider
  • 2 cups orange juice
  • 1 cup lemon juice
  • ½ cup sugar
  • 2 teaspoons cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon cloves
  • 1 teaspoon nutmeg
  • 1 orange, sliced
  • ½ cup brandy, optional

Instructions

  1. Mix juices, sugar and seasonings together. Add the brandy at this point to make the alcoholic wassail.
  2. Slowly bring to a boil in a large saucepan or pot. Boil for 1 minute.
  3. Reduce heat and simmer for 30 minutes.
  4. Serve hot with sliced oranges floating in the punch bowl.

Tips & Notes

  • The cider can be made a day ahead to steep. Just reheat when ready to serve.
  • Did you know? It takes 36 apples to create 1 gallon of apple cider, which makes you appreciate it that much more.

13 COMMENTS

  1. […] This is definitely the easiest one, if you’re concerned with prep time. You just chuck a bunch of stuff in a big pot and boil it. The most complicated it gets is cutting up oranges and floating them on top. That might seem lazy, but we’ll defend it by saying, if you think you need complications and multipage recipes to make a drink colonists used to drink while they beat up adoptees, you’re kind of missing the point. Recipe […]

  2. […] This is definitely the easiest one, if you’re concerned with prep time. You just chuck a bunch of stuff in a big pot and boil it. The most complicated it gets is cutting up oranges and floating them on top. That might seem lazy, but we’ll defend it by saying, if you think you need complications and multipage recipes to make a drink colonists used to drink while they beat up adoptees, you’re kind of missing the point. Recipe […]

  3. […] This is definitely the easiest one, if you’re concerned with prep time. You just chuck a bunch of stuff in a big pot and boil it. The most complicated it gets is cutting up oranges and floating them on top. That might seem lazy, but we’ll defend it by saying, if you think you need complications and multipage recipes to make a drink colonists used to drink while they beat up adoptees, you’re kind of missing the point. Recipe […]

  4. […] This is definitely the easiest one, if you’re concerned with prep time. You just chuck a bunch of stuff in a big pot and boil it. The most complicated it gets is cutting up oranges and floating them on top. That might seem lazy, but we’ll defend it by saying, if you think you need complications and multipage recipes to make a drink colonists used to drink while they beat up adoptees, you’re kind of missing the point. Recipe […]

  5. […] This is definitely the easiest one, if you’re concerned with prep time. You just chuck a bunch of stuff in a big pot and boil it. The most complicated it gets is cutting up oranges and floating them on top. That might seem lazy, but we’ll defend it by saying, if you think you need complications and multipage recipes to make a drink colonists used to drink while they beat up adoptees, you’re kind of missing the point. Recipe […]

  6. […] This is definitely the easiest one, if you’re concerned with prep time. You just chuck a bunch of stuff in a big pot and boil it. The most complicated it gets is cutting up oranges and floating them on top. That might seem lazy, but we’ll defend it by saying, if you think you need complications and multipage recipes to make a drink colonists used to drink while they beat up adoptees, you’re kind of missing the point. Recipe […]

  7. […] The wassail itself “is a hot, mulled punch often associated with Yuletide, drunk from a ‘wassailing bowl’. The earliest versions were warmed mead into which roasted crab apples were dropped and burst to create a drink called ‘lambswool’ drunk on Lammas day, still known in Shakespeare’s time. Later, the drink evolved to become a mulled cider made with sugar, cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg, topped with slices of toast as sops and drunk from a large communal bowl.” (See traditional wassail recipe here) […]

  8. […] The wassail itself “is a hot, mulled punch often associated with Yuletide, drunk from a ‘wassailing bowl’. The earliest versions were warmed mead into which roasted crab apples were dropped and burst to create a drink called ‘lambswool’ drunk on Lammas day, still known in Shakespeare’s time. Later, the drink evolved to become a mulled cider made with sugar, cinnamon, ginger and nutmeg, topped with slices of toast as sops and drunk from a large communal bowl.” (See traditional wassail recipe here) […]

  9. This recipe does not contain alcohol. Alcohol turns to vapor at 174 degrees F. When you boil this mixture, he alcohol is cooked out. Water boils at 212 degrees. I suggest you bring this to a boil, then cool to 120 degrees before adding alcohol.

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